Vietnam War Complete Series Review
Vietnam War Complete Series Review
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DVD for Sale : Star Trek Discovery Season 1 on DVDs in Australia

DVD for Sale : Star Trek Discovery Season 1 on DVDs in Australia

DVD for Sale : Star Trek Discovery Season 1 on DVDs in Australia

Order dvds online cheap for Star Trek Discovery Season 1 on DVDs in Australia from DVDSHELF.COM.AU

Where can I buy cheap dvds online for Star Trek Discovery Season 1 DVD? Star Trek Discovery (fondly known as ‘Disco’ by fans) is the newest iteration of a ‘live’ television series since the ‘Enterprise’ series was cancelled (in my view prematurely) back in 2005 by UPN. Star Trek went into something of a hiatus for a while after the commercial flop that was ST Nemesis and the cancellation of Enterprise, and no-one seemed to want to touch the Trek franchise. The series was ‘re-booted’ in 2009 by J.J. Abrams, whose new take on the franchise was met with mixed reception. The idea of a new series had clearly been in the air for a while, but CBS only announced it would release a new series in 2017 on the ‘All-Access’ Cable Channel. Cable-channel SF has been around for some time, and shows like Babylon 5, Firefly and The Expanse have shown that made-to-order series can work by subscription, rather than broadcast by network models more dependent on ratings to stay afloat. While a lot of people have complained about the need to get a subscription to watch a shows, it is clear subscription-based shows have some advantages over those of Network-based shows – they are more free to experiment, show more graphic material and explore more complex and dark themes, and also they are freed from the constraint to please a certain target audience, which arguably is a big weakness with Star Trek and its complex ‘canon.’ A lot of people from the get-go expressed hatred and frustration with this new series. The initial premise (a Federation/Klingon war, the arc of redemption involving a convicted mutineer, a mysterious roguish Captain and an experimental Starfleet ship with technology never mentioned before) seemed strange and somewhat confusing. The Klingons looked completely unlike anything depicted before, and the ‘War’ Arc seemed to really contradict canon, leading to endless speculation about whether the show was part of the official timeline, if the characters were in another universe, and so on. I did feel the show copied too many ideas that worked well in other shows, such as Game of Thrones, Vikings, Battlestar Galactica, The Expanse and so on, at least at first. The show didn’t seem to quite know what is was doing and where it was going. This inconsistency showed itself many times across the arc of the first series. This confusion was made worse by (spoiler warning) first introducing a primary story arc involving the Klingons (whose depiction ranged from brutal and mindless savages to aliens with a complicated culture, yet who seemed to be fighting for good reasons and then no reasons at all) and then a second, four-episode long arc involving the ‘Mirror’ Evil Universe. These issues with continuity were made more frustrating by the killings of major characters, who arguably should have either been explored in more depth and given more time ‘alive’ so that facets of their characters could be explored. A further frustration for me was the series seemed to pace itself too fast and tried to do too much in too short a time-span. The series would have been much better if the writers had concentrated on a single continuous arc focused on one theme alone (i.e. the Klingons or the Mirror Universe) and done so in a standard format of between 16 and 24 well-written and thought out episodes. The ‘mid-season break’ did nothing for me and the series should have continued in an arc like The Expanse, without an annoying two-month disruption that left us waiting. Also, one major episode in the series was only about 36 minutes long, which was far too short and worked at such a pace hardly anything happened. The same could be seen in the battles and special effects – despite some very good moments, too often the space battles and phaser battles between enemies seemed lopsided, too short and sometimes little more than akin to a video game with cheesy laser and torpedo sounds as ships or people shot at each other. Too many moments of the show felt like ‘Space Invaders’, even the Battle of the Binary Stars at the beginning. I hope in the second series, the writers have learned from these issues and improve the show.

Buy dvds on line for Star Trek Discovery Season 1. A final complaint of mine is the level of violence and profanity in the show. I felt the themes could have been just as well done without some of the extreme violence. The Klingons for example, were reduced somewhat to one-dimensional ‘savages’ when the writers claimed they wanted to establish them as a genuinely independent and complex race. The allusions to contemporary politics and events were also not done as well in my view as in other shows such as The Expanse, with the comparison between the Klingons and Islamic State too clear, and the speech of one character being too obviously ‘Donald Trumpish’ to be taken seriously. I prefer it when SF deals with politics using clever storytelling and good character development, which this show tended to gloss over because of the high numbers of premature deaths. Despite my complaints, I feel some things did work. It was good to see this show treat the female characters seriously (particularly Michael Burnham, Admiral Katrina Cornwall, Cadet Tilly, L’Rell and Captain Philipa Georgiou), who were not depicted as either silly bimbos dependent on men to work effectively or as ‘Amazons’ who had to emulate men to be effective. I felt that the female characters in this show were permitted to be themselves and to be effective, strong, independent characters in their own right, without having to be validated by their male colleagues. A second thing I enjoyed about the show was the depiction of the gay relationship between Paul Stamets and Dr Culber. For the first time, Trek did not shy away from depicting gay characters simply in a muted and silly fashion (as some TNG and DS9) episodes did or simply ignore the issue completely (TOS, Voyager and so on). The relationship had a genuine feeling of warmth and authenticity without going into stereotyping (the characters retain their masculinity and positive features, such as leadership, courage, ethical principles and integrity). While this would have been more risky to do on Network television, I feel this part of the show was handled extremely well. Jason Isaacs also did a good job as the mysterious Captain Lorca, and his departure from the series is a bit of a disappointment. The technology of the ships, especially the Discovery was also generally well-handled (if one can get over the technobabble about the Spore Drive) which had a lovely design, and the palettes for space scenes were done extremely well. For the first time, when a space scene was shown, it felt like a genuine reality rather than a second-rate graphic made by a computer program that could be done by someone in high school. The new ships (except for the Klingon ones) generally had a pleasing aesthetic form that was realistic and credible. The ending to the season, particularly the last scene, was also done quite well, though the final two episodes in my view that ‘finished’ the Klingon War arc wrapped a very complicated and dangerous situation for the Federation all too quickly and almost with too many clich¨¦d Deus ex Macina moments. Still, the ending of the final episode set up a nice cliffhanger of sorts that hopefully will lead well into the next series. I hope by then the staff, cast and writers do a better job of making the series coherent and set this somewhat wobbly show that still seems unsure of itself back onto a more clear path to success.

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